34% of our workforce are veterans or military spouses. LMI is committed to building the military community workforce of the future through education, training, and mentorship.

LMI BY THE NUMBERS

54% of our people hold advanced degrees. LMI appreciates the expertise, insights, and ingenuity of every LMIer in the organization.

34%   

Hiring Veterans

Leading Education

Enhanced Training 
 

LMI is proud to have spent nearly $1,000,000 in training, development,
and tuition assistance for its staff.

54%  

$1M  

Cultivating Success

$240M  

With FY17 total revenue of $240.3 million, LMI continues to drive success with the industry's most talented people and cutting-edge solutions.

Government Focused

40  

For more than 55 years, LMI has worked with 40 government agencies. From the Department of Defense to Health and Human Services, LMI is honored to support the government's mission and people around the globe.

100%  

LMI’s FY17 customer survey metrics indicated our clients were 100% satisfied with our work. “We highly value the LMI team, and given the quality of products, we have them back working for us.” 
­-Department of the Army, Joint Logistics customer
Client Approval
Return to top

NEARLY

ANNUAL      REPORT

Pursuing Passion and Policy
CLAIRE DENTON-SPALDING

Even as a little girl, Claire Denton-Spalding felt a moral imperative to serve. Her parents, active and engaged themselves, nurtured her interest in helping others and encouraged her to volunteer—something she did abroad during high school and through college.

“Compassion is important. My parents modeled that for me. I saw public service as a good way to empower communities that have traditionally been disempowered and to make sure people who are traditionally ignored have access to healthcare and other services.”

Claire took that spirit with her after college, through several years in Argentina (where she became fluent in Spanish) and into her first job, with a nonprofit offering social services and advocacy for Latina women. Over time, she knew she wanted to stretch what she could do for others.

While completing her master’s degree in public affairs at Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Claire started thinking about where her education and experiences would take her. She met Owen McDougall, a Princeton grad who had gone through LMI’s Public Policy Fellows (PPF) program. “He told me I could go down one of two paths with my degree—policy creation or policy implementation. I started thinking about how governments make sure policies are understood and implemented correctly, doing the best they can with the resources they have.” Owen encouraged her to give LMI a look. Everything clicked for Claire. 
“I attended an information session and informational interview for the PPF program and loved it.” 

As a Public Policy Fellow working to help potential Accountable Care Organizations ensure they can comply with Affordable Care Act regulations, Claire appreciates the opportunity LMI has given her to learn holistically about how different pieces work together to make meaningful change happen. It is something she never got to see when she was working at the smaller nonprofit.

“Our healthcare system is incredibly intricate, with state and federal components. But I’ve always enjoyed that—looking at a very complex problem, figuring out the major issues, and coming up with solutions.” The PPF program enables her to meet people across the company who work on different aspects of the healthcare challenge; she has found this to be a great way to break down silos. A self-described “policy nerd,” Claire has big plans for making the most of the training and conference stipends the PPF program affords her.

The enthusiasm and energy Claire brings to LMI flows through every part of her life. She’s not afraid of a challenge, whether it’s pushing past her stage fright to play harp with an Irish folk band or picking up contra dancing despite an admitted lack of coordination. Although Claire is a newcomer to the Washington, DC, area, she has found a novel way to share her passions—and her commitment to service—by volunteering at a 1700s apothecary-turned-museum. She now leads health policy–themed tours there.

Curiosity, engagement, and a deep-rooted commitment to serving others; it’s qualities like these that LMI values in its people, and that Claire has found she values in LMI as well. “I’m looking for a career that is exciting and interesting and where I can continually learn. I also believe you need to do work that is meaningful and helps others. Public service comes from a desire to make other people’s lives better. I see LMI as a good place to do that.”

Return to top

A Drive to Succeed
CHUCK LORENCE

Chuck Lorence’s path to LMI has been anything but conventional. His 6 years in the Marines (including tours of duty in Somalia and Haiti) helped refine his “will-do” work ethic and passion to see a job well done, but it was his years growing up on welfare that conditioned him to look for opportunity and seize it.

Multiple sclerosis made it difficult for his mother to work, and he never knew his father. Chuck sought out role models as he grew up—the parents of friends who drove their kids to succeed. “I latched onto the kids who did well,” he says. “I integrated into their families because I wanted to do better.” He joined the Marine Corps during his senior year as a pathway to college through the GI Bill. “I was able to go to college and break the cycle of poverty, and I’m rather proud of that.”   

From that first step, he has been unstoppable, quickly grabbing the attention and interest of his peers and mentors along the way. While stationed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, he took it upon himself to learn Visual Basic programming. Learning to code launched a new career path as he went on to earn his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in software engineering. From there, an IT internship for a company that ran a network of long-term healthcare facilities led to a full-time job and, eventually, friendship with an LMIer.   

Chuck eagerly accepted an offer to come aboard in 2005. “When I came to LMI, I saw that people put forth real effort. I’m surrounded by highly educated and motivated coworkers who love what they do and are proud of seeing a job done well. It is so refreshing.”   

Now, Chuck leads a project on the same U.S. Postal Service program where he started as a software developer, at LMI's office in Aberdeen, Maryland. “I am working for a client who cares, who constantly wants to improve. It’s not just about coming in and coding. I really feel LMI makes a difference, helping USPS manage its safety program and keep people safe.”   

Chuck gets up most mornings before dawn to log a 20+ mile bike ride before work. Never one to back down from a challenge, he took up lacrosse as an adult. “I was terrible at baseball when I was little. The only way I got to first base was getting hit by a pitch, so I didn’t want that for my kids.” His family picked lacrosse, and his sons became more invested in the sport. So did Chuck, first as a coach, before picking up a stick.   

He explains, “I bought Lacrosse for Dummies and other books for drills. Some other parents eventually asked me, ‘Why don’t you come out and try to play?’ So I cobbled together some equipment and went out and had a great time.” Today, Chuck’s volunteerism includes a charity event for veterans called “Shoot Out for Soldiers,” a 24-hour cycle of back-to-back lacrosse games. He tells the story of once conducting training in Washington, DC, driving to Maryland for a 2:30 a.m. match, then driving back to make the start of an 8 a.m. class.   

That “don’t quit for anything” spirit can be taken to extremes, Chuck admits. (He only recently stopped ironing his shirts when they came back from the cleaners.) But it’s his philosophy of seizing life, centered in gratitude that motivates him to give his all, inside and outside of work.   

“The world gave me the opportunity to make a better life for my family. And every day I do my best to make the most of that opportunity.”

Return to top

ANNUAL
REPORT

Sarah monitors data inputs on a system that is frequently changing. With 150–200 trucks on the road daily carrying 50,000 shipments per year, it’s a lot to track. But it’s also the perfect fit considering her dual degrees in accounting and human resources, two intensely detail-oriented and user-focused programs.

“What I pride myself on is I have done what they have done, so I can act as a mediator between the front office and the system operators. The system changes every day. I know what the operators are going through. I feel their pain,” she says.

Sarah also trains the new hires, a task that doubles as her own on-the-job research. “I always ask a new 

hire, ‘Tell me something that you think could be changed to make things easier, less stressful for you.’” 
She then treats it as a challenge to devise new ways to improve DTTS to make it more intuitive and productive for users.

Sarah is all about making life better for people outside of work, too. She spends well over 100 hours annually volunteering for American Cancer Society (ACS) Relay for Life events. “I’ve been involved 
since I was 15,” she says, “when one of my mom’s close friends was battling ovarian cancer. And my involvement just grew from there. Six years ago, my father was diagnosed with skin cancer and continues to go through treatment to keep it at bay.” Since 2005, Sarah and her Relay for Life team have raised more than $60,000 for the ACS. 

It’s an intense commitment, but one that’s a source of pride and satisfaction.

Her orientation toward serving others has its roots in her childhood. She’s always had exposure to the military; her dad served in the Air Force and, in fact, works not far from Sarah at Scott Air Force Base. She learned from him to work hard and to value the work that other people do. “I will never consider myself higher than anyone else,” she says. “I feel that every job has a purpose, even when I was working at a coffee shop right out of college. I didn’t do much, other than make coffee, but it made people happy, and that meant something to me.”

At LMI, Sarah has found a place that fits her interests, skills, and personality. “I like this work because it’s part of a bigger picture, bigger even than this office. Its effect is command-wide. I’ve never been the type of person who was OK with disappointing people. And seeing LMI’s commitment to this work just strengthens my own commitment. I really want to be here and do this.”

Sometimes the quiet actions speak the loudest.

Sarah Messer, an LMI research analyst on the Defense Transportation Tracking System (DTTS) program, is not one to brag. But she brings a quality of empathy to her work and personal life that makes everything she 

does shine.

Before coming to LMI 6 years ago, Sarah interned with DTTS at Scott Air Force Base, monitoring and assisting commercial trucks that carry essential shipments of sensitive assets for the Department of Defense across the country every day. Now she supports the operators who monitor this fleet.

Practical Approaches 
to Big Results
SARAH MESSER

Return to top

The Many Sides of Service
MICHAEL DALEY

Service is in LMI’s DNA.

It’s in Michael Daley’s, too. Like his grandfather (Navy), father (Coast Guard), 

and brother (Marines) before him, this newly minted LMIer began his career 
serving the country.

Directly out of high school, Michael joined the Marines and during his 4 years there developed a work ethic that stands out today. “You work all day until the work is done,” he says of his active-duty life. “By the time 

I was 20, I was in charge of seven or eight other guys. So, I gained self-confidence. I learned how to lead in high-stress environments and the importance of attention to detail.”

These qualities, while rare in the marketplace, are actually quite common at LMI. In fact, they are exactly what we seek when we bring on new hires. At LMI, Michael provides executive support to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Logistics and Materiel Readiness. He follows a number of other LMIers who began making their mark from the same platform, in much the same way.

LMI started this novel approach to talent development years ago. Recognizing that the best people seldom follow the same path, we started looking closely at young career professionals who sought to break into the consulting industry but lacked a traditional background. To LMI, the “right” people have always been the ones who are bright, energetic, and eager to learn, and who aspire to improve themselves throughout their career.

Michael certainly fits the description of unconventional. A true “grab-life-by-the-horns” kind of person, he enjoys competitive skydiving, a passion he recently discovered. Three months after his last deployment, Michael was already in the classroom, working toward his undergraduate degree in international relations and Russian history from the University of New Hampshire. A post-graduation stint as a bartender not only taught him how to make a mean drink but also to be comfortable interacting with all types of people—including former presidents—and how to remain personable and friendly even on a bad day. A chance conversation with a military buddy led to his first job at the Pentagon, where he befriended two LMIers.

LMI seeks out people like Michael and gives them a role through which they can learn from others with experience in their field, all while giving them the funding and support to continue their education. We have found that affording smart, motivated individuals the opportunity to combine education and meaningful on-the-job experience is equivalent to home-growing internal PhDs.

Time and again, we have seen the success that comes from seeking out the bold but unconventional. In fact, our current manager of the LMI Research Institute began her career at LMI in the same role as Michael, less than a decade ago.

Today, as Michael prepares to begin his master’s degree program in security studies at Georgetown University, he speaks with the same wholehearted spirit that has marked each step of his life’s path. “My experience has been nothing but great,” he says of LMI. “I’ve now learned about the other side of the military. I’ve been exposed to how senior leaders think, how components interact, and how decisions flow through the Pentagon. I think what has surprised me most, though, is the extreme enthusiasm I see in every person I meet.” In LMI, it seems he has found the perfect match.

Return to top

Defining Your 
Own Success
ERIC HERZBERG

Eric Herzberg learned the meaning of grit when he was 17. As a 116-pound freshman at West Point, he quickly learned that even when things get very difficult, you can't quit. “The physical requirements were brutal: boxing, wrestling, swimming, gymnastics,” he says. “I was constantly outside my comfort zone, but 
I realized, ‘I’ll either fail miserably or learn something, so I might as well learn something.’”

After 5 years of active duty, Eric entered the private sector, making his way up the ranks at Michelin. There, he introduced a system that changed the metrics and focus of Michelin’s North American production plants by tying rewards to performance.

After 13 years at Michelin, Eric was mid-career and a business success. Yet as he took stock of his accomplishments, he felt that his talents were needed elsewhere. “I asked myself, ‘What is my own vision of success?’ I’m a person of faith. When I end my time on earth, I have to account for what I did with my gifts.”

Reflection led Eric to spend a year volunteering full-time at CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) as an advocate and tutor for homeless and abused children, an experience he describes as amazing. When he was ready to return to the workforce, he gravitated toward a not-for-profit. LMI was the perfect fit for his mathematical and organizational talents and his desire to serve.

Today, he and his team (colleagues Rebecca Stroh, Trevor Chan, Siwei Guo, Alec Morris, and Anne Stevenson) have created a one-of-a-kind data warehouse containing over 1.5 billion records on maintenance and availability for Department of Defense weapons systems. Eric is especially proud that the data warehouse can produce a weapon system health scorecard—basically a letter grade from A to F—for each weapon system in DoD. It represents a huge advance in how DoD manages cost, availability, and the relationship between the two.

Put a period on Eric’s accomplishments right there and it would be a list to make anyone proud. But what Eric does in his personal life holds even more meaning for him. To honor his son, Marine Lance Corporal Eric Herzberg, who died in 2006 while deployed in Iraq, Eric directs two nonprofit foundations. The Fallen Heroes Portrait Project provides custom portraits to the families of fallen heroes at no charge. The Eric W. Herzberg Memorial Scholarship supports deserving students each year and has awarded more than $125,000 to date. LMI supports both organizations, for which Eric is grateful. “The way LMI has treated me has become a good model for how I treat people.”

He continues, “It doesn’t matter how much you know or how smart you think you are. Things can change in an instant. A lot of what happened in my personal life has changed the way I approach my work. I don’t want to be judged a success by the things that I have achieved, but by the person who I’ve been.”

“Now, I feel that although I am a task-oriented person, the way I get things done is just as important. You have to involve people. You have to care about their welfare. It doesn’t matter what your relationship to someone is: always be kind, always share success, and always share the credit.”
 

Return to top

2017 was a year of evolution for LMI. We celebrated milestones, welcomed new employees, and met new customer challenges.

Behind each LMI success story is an employee committed to our mission. Our culture is fortified by our diverse backgrounds and experiences. Each of us approaches challenges in our own way; our ability to encourage difference and collaborate enables us to exceed client expectations. Our shared values power that collaboration. It is a privilege to lead this company, and together
we lead with character.

As LMI continues to evolve, our culture remains strong because our employees are ready to lead and innovate on behalf of their sense of mission, whether at work or in their communities. Enclosed are a few stories of character that highlight a banner year for LMI.



Letter from

THE CEO



Dave Zolet


PURSUING 
PASSION 
AND POLICY
CLAIRE DENTON-SPALDING

Even as a little girl, Claire Denton-Spalding felt a moral imperative to serve. Her parents, active and engaged themselves, nurtured her interest in helping others and encouraged her to volunteer—something she did abroad during high school and through college.

“Compassion is important. My parents modeled that for me. I saw public service as a good way to empower communities that have traditionally been disempowered and to make sure people who are traditionally ignored have access to healthcare and other services,” she says.   

Claire took that spirit with her after college, through several years in Argentina (where she became fluent in Spanish) and into her first job, with a nonprofit offering social services and advocacy for Latina women. Over time, she knew she wanted to stretch what she could do for others.   

While completing her master’s degree in public affairs at Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Claire started thinking about where her education and experiences would take her. She met Owen McDougall, a Princeton grad who had gone through LMI’s Public Policy Fellows (PPF) program. “He told me I could go down one of two paths with my degree—policy creation or policy implementation. I started thinking about how governments make sure policies are understood and implemented correctly, doing the best they can with the resources they have.” Owen encouraged her to give LMI a look. Everything clicked for Claire. “I attended an information session and informational interview for the PPF program and loved it.”   

As a Public Policy Fellow working to help potential Accountable Care Organizations ensure they can comply with Affordable Care Act regulations, Claire appreciates the opportunity LMI has given her to learn holistically about how different pieces work together to make meaningful change happen. It is something she never got to see when she was working at the smaller nonprofit.   

“Our healthcare system is incredibly intricate, with state and federal components. But I’ve always enjoyed that—looking at a very complex problem, figuring out the major issues, and coming up with solutions.” The PPF program enables her to meet people across the company who work on different aspects of the healthcare challenge; she has found this to be a great way to break down silos. A self-described “policy nerd,” Claire has big plans for making the most of the training and conference stipends the PPF program affords her.   

The enthusiasm and energy Claire brings to LMI flows through every part of her life. She’s not afraid of a challenge, whether it’s pushing past her stage fright to play harp with an Irish folk band or picking up contra dancing despite an admitted lack of coordination. Although Claire is a newcomer to the Washington, DC, area, she has found a novel way to share her passions—and her commitment to service—by volunteering at a 1700s apothecary-turned-museum. She developed and now conducts health policy–themed tours there.   

Curiosity, engagement, and a deep-rooted commitment to serving others; it’s qualities like these that LMI values in its people, and that Claire has found she values in LMI as well. “I’m looking for a career that is exciting and interesting and where I can continually learn. I also believe you need to do work that is meaningful and helps others. Public service comes from a desire to make other people’s lives better. I see LMI as a good place to do that.”   

Return to top

A DRIVE 
TO SUCCEED
CHUCK LORENCE

Chuck Lorence’s path to LMI has been anything but conventional. His 6 years in the Marines (including tours of duty in Somalia and Haiti) helped refine his “will-do” work ethic and passion to see a job well done, but it was his years growing up on welfare that conditioned him to look for opportunity and seize it.

Multiple sclerosis made it difficult for his mother to work, and he never knew his father. Chuck sought out role models as he grew up—the parents of friends who drove their kids to succeed. “I latched onto the kids who did well,” he says. “I integrated into their families because I wanted to do better.” He joined the Marine Corps during his senior year as a pathway to college through the GI Bill. “I was able to go to college and break the cycle of poverty, and I’m rather proud of that.”   

From that first step, he has been unstoppable, quickly grabbing the attention and interest of his peers and mentors along the way. While stationed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, he took it upon himself to learn Visual Basic programming. Learning to code launched a new career path as he went on to earn his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in software engineering. From there, an IT internship for a company that ran a network of long-term healthcare facilities led to a full-time job and, eventually, friendship with an LMIer.   

Chuck eagerly accepted an offer to come aboard in 2005. “When I came to LMI, I saw that people put forth real effort. I’m surrounded by highly educated and motivated coworkers who love what they do and are proud of seeing a job done well. It is so refreshing.”   

Now, Chuck leads a project on the same U.S. Postal Service program where he started as a software developer, at LMI's office in Aberdeen, Maryland. “I am working for a client who cares, who constantly wants to improve. It’s not just about coming in and coding. I really feel LMI makes a difference, helping USPS manage its safety program and keep people safe.”   

Chuck gets up most mornings before dawn to log a 20+ mile bike ride before work. Never one to back down from a challenge, he took up lacrosse as an adult. “I was terrible at baseball when I was little. The only way I got to first base was getting hit by a pitch, so I didn’t want that for my kids.” His family picked lacrosse, and his sons became more invested in the sport. So did Chuck, first as a coach, before picking up a stick.   

He explains, “I bought Lacrosse for Dummies and other books for drills. Some other parents eventually asked me, ‘Why don’t you come out and try to play?’ So I cobbled together some equipment and went out and had a great time.” Today, Chuck’s volunteerism includes a charity event for veterans called “Shoot Out for Soldiers,” a 24-hour cycle of back-to-back lacrosse games. He tells the story of once conducting training in Washington, DC, driving to Maryland for a 2:30 a.m. match, then driving back to make the start of an 8 a.m. class.   

That “don’t quit for anything” spirit can be taken to extremes, Chuck admits. (He only recently stopped ironing his shirts when they came back from the cleaners.) But it’s his philosophy of seizing life, centered in gratitude that motivates him to give his all, inside and outside of work.   

“The world gave me the opportunity to make a better life for my family. And every day I do my best to make the most of that opportunity.”

Return to top

Sometimes the quiet actions speak the loudest.

Sarah Messer, an LMI research analyst on the Defense Transportation Tracking System (DTTS) program, is not one to brag. But she brings a quality of empathy to her work and personal life that makes everything she 
does shine.

Before coming to LMI 6 years ago, Sarah interned with DTTS at Scott Air Force Base, monitoring and assisting commercial trucks that carry essential shipments of sensitive assets for the Department of Defense across the country every day. Now she supports the operators who monitor this fleet. 

Sarah monitors data inputs on a system that is frequently changing. With 150–200 trucks on the road daily carrying 50,000 shipments per year, it’s a lot to track. But it’s also the perfect fit considering her dual degrees in accounting and human resources, two intensely detail-oriented and user-focused programs.

“What I pride myself on is I have done what they have done, so I can act as a mediator between the front office and the system operators. The system changes every day. I know what the operators are going through. I feel their pain,” she says.

Sarah also trains the new hires, a task that doubles as her own on-the-job research. “I always ask a new 
hire, ‘Tell me something that you think could be changed to make things easier, less stressful for you.’” She then treats it as a challenge to devise new ways to improve DTTS to make it more intuitive and productive for users.

Sarah is all about making life better for people outside of work, too. She spends well over 100 hours annually volunteering for American Cancer Society (ACS) Relay for Life events. “I’ve been involved 
since I was 15,” she says, “when one of my mom’s close friends was battling ovarian cancer. And my involvement just grew from there. Six years ago, my father was diagnosed with skin cancer and continues to go through treatment to keep it at bay.” Since 2005, Sarah and her Relay for Life team have raised more than $60,000 for the ACS. 
It’s an intense commitment, but one that’s a source of pride and satisfaction.

Her orientation toward serving others has its roots in her childhood. She’s always had exposure to the military; her dad served in the Air Force and, in fact, works not far from Sarah at Scott Air Force Base. She learned from him to work hard and to value the work that other people do. “I will never consider myself higher than anyone else,” she says. “I feel that every job has a purpose, even when I was working at a coffee shop right out of college. I didn’t do much, other than make coffee, but it made people happy, and that meant something to me.”

At LMI, Sarah has found a place that fits her interests, skills, and personality. “I like this work because it’s part of a bigger picture, bigger even than this office. Its effect is command-wide. I’ve never been the type of person who was OK with disappointing people. And seeing LMI’s commitment to this work just strengthens my own commitment. I really want to be here and do this.”

PRACTICAL APPROACHES TO BIG RESULTS
SARAH MESSER

Return to top

The Many Sides of Service 
MICHAEL DALEY

Service is in LMI’s DNA.

It’s in Michael Daley’s, too. Like his grandfather (Navy), father (Coast Guard), 
and brother (Marines) before him, this newly minted LMIer began his career serving the country.

Directly out of high school, Michael joined the Marines and during his 4 years there developed a work ethic that stands out today. “You work all day until the work is done,” he says of his active-duty life. “By the time I was 20, I was in charge of seven or eight other guys. So, I gained self-confidence. I learned how to lead in high-stress environments and the importance of attention to detail.”

These qualities, while rare in the marketplace, are actually quite common at LMI. In fact, they are exactly what we seek when we bring on new hires. At LMI, Michael provides executive support to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Logistics and Materiel Readiness. He follows a number of other LMIers who began making their mark from the same platform, in much the same way.

LMI started this novel approach to talent development years ago. Recognizing that the best people seldom follow the same path, we started looking closely at young career professionals who sought to break into the consulting industry but lacked a traditional background. To LMI, the “right” people have always been the ones who are bright, energetic, and eager to learn, and who aspire to improve themselves throughout their career.

Michael certainly fits the description of unconventional. A true “grab-life-by-the-horns” kind of person, he enjoys competitive skydiving, a passion he recently discovered. Three months after his last deployment, Michael was already in the classroom, working toward his undergraduate degree in international relations and Russian history from the University of New Hampshire. A post-graduation stint as a bartender not only taught him how to make a mean drink but also to be comfortable interacting with all types of people—including former presidents—and how to remain personable and friendly even on a bad day. A chance conversation with a military buddy led to his first job at the Pentagon, where he befriended two LMIers.

LMI seeks out people like Michael and gives them a role through which they can learn from others with experience in their field, all while giving them the funding and support to continue their education. We have found that affording smart, motivated individuals the opportunity to combine education and meaningful on-the-job experience is equivalent to home-growing internal 
PhDs.

Time and again, we have seen the success that comes from seeking out the bold but unconventional. In fact, our current manager of the LMI Research Institute began her career at LMI in the same role as Michael, less than a 

decade ago.

Today, as Michael prepares to begin his master’s degree program in security studies at Georgetown University, he speaks with the same wholehearted spirit that has marked each step of his life’s path. “My experience has been nothing but great,” he says of LMI. “I’ve now learned about the other side of the military. I’ve been exposed to how senior leaders think, how components interact, and how decisions flow through the Pentagon. I think what has surprised me most, though, is the extreme enthusiasm I see in every person I meet.” In LMI, it seems he has found the perfect match.

Return to top

Defining Your 
Own Success

ERIC HERZBERG

Eric Herzberg learned the meaning of grit when he was 17. As a 116-pound freshman at West Point, he quickly learned that even when things get very difficult, you can't quit. “The physical requirements were brutal: boxing, wrestling, swimming, gymnastics,” he says. “I was constantly outside my comfort zone, but I realized, ‘I’ll either fail miserably or learn something, so I might as well learn something.’”

After 5 years of active duty, Eric entered the private sector, making his way up the ranks at Michelin. There, he introduced a system that changed the metrics and focus of Michelin’s North American production plants by tying rewards to performance.

After 13 years at Michelin, Eric was mid-career and a business success. Yet as he took stock of his accomplishments, he felt that his talents were needed elsewhere. “I asked myself, ‘What is my own vision of success?’ I’m a person of faith. When I end my time on earth, I have to account for what I did with my gifts.”

Reflection led Eric to spend a year volunteering full-time at CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) as an advocate and tutor for homeless and abused children, an experience he describes as amazing. When he was ready to return to the workforce, he gravitated toward a not-for-profit. LMI was the perfect fit for his mathematical and organizational talents and his desire to serve.

Today, he and his team (colleagues Rebecca Stroh, Trevor Chan, Siwei Guo, Alec Morris, and Anne Stevenson) have created a one-of-a-kind data warehouse containing over 1.5 billion records on maintenance and availability for Department of Defense weapons systems. Eric is especially proud that the data warehouse can produce a weapon system health scorecard—basically a letter grade from A to F—for each weapon system in DoD. It represents a huge advance in how DoD manages cost, availability, and the relationship between the two.

Put a period on Eric’s accomplishments right there and it would be a list to make anyone proud. But what Eric does in his personal life holds even more meaning for him. To honor his son, Marine Lance Corporal Eric Herzberg, who died in 2006 while deployed in Iraq, Eric directs two nonprofit foundations. The Fallen Heroes Portrait Project provides custom portraits to the families of fallen heroes at no charge. The Eric W. Herzberg Memorial Scholarship supports deserving students each year and has awarded more than $125,000 to date. LMI supports both organizations, for which Eric is grateful. “The way LMI has treated me has become a good model for how I treat people.”

He continues, “It doesn’t matter how much you know or how smart you think you are. Things can change in an instant. A lot of what happened in my personal life has changed the way I approach my work. I don’t want to be judged a success by the things that I have achieved, but by the person who I’ve been.”

“Now, I feel that although I am a task-oriented person, the way I get things done is just as important. You have to involve people. You have to care about their welfare. It doesn’t matter what your relationship to someone is: always be kind, always share success, and always share the credit.”














Return to top
34% of our workforce are veterans or military spouses. LMI is committed
to building the military community workforce of the future through education, training, and mentorship.

LMI BY THE NUMBERS  

54% of our people hold advanced degrees. LMI appreciates the expertise, insights, and ingenuity of every LMIer in the organization.

34%   

Hiring Veterans

Leading Education

Enhanced Training 
 

LMI is proud to have spent nearly $1,000,000 in training, development,
and tuition assistance for its staff.

54%  

$1M  

Cultivating Success

$240M  

With FY17 total revenue of $240.3 million, LMI continues to drive success with the industry's most talented people and cutting-edge solutions.

Government Focused

40  

For more than 55 years, LMI has worked with 40 government agencies. From the Department of Defense to Health and Human Services, LMI is honored to support the government's mission and people around the globe.

100%  

LMI’s FY17 customer survey metrics indicated our clients were 100% satisfied with our work. “We highly value the LMI team, and given the quality of products, we have them back working for us.” 
-Department of the Army, Joint Logistics customer
Client Approval
Return to top

NEARLY  

© 2018 LMI. All rights reserved.

© 2018 LMI. All rights reserved.

Stay in touch